Beyond Midnight: Paul Revere

Drawing on the American Antiquarian Society’s unparalleled collection of prints and books, the exhibition, Beyond Midnight: Paul Revere, will transform viewers’ understanding of the iconic colonial patriot. This in-depth examination of Revere’s many skills as a craftsman will help illustrate the entrepreneurial spirit of an early American artisan who stood at the intersection of social, economic, and political life during the formation of the new nation.

Below, enjoy a virtual tour of the exhibition as it appeared at the New-York Historical Society.

Smith Gallery of the New-York Historical Society with recreation of the Stamp Act Obelisk.
Entrance to Beyond Midnight: Paul Revere.
Introductory panel with Old North Church facade and holographic Pepper's Ghost Box depicting Revere's silver shop.
Revolutionary Revere. Featuring early engravings from AAS, a silver tea pot lent by Worcester Art Museum and tea recovered after the Boston Tea Party.
Revolutionary Revere. Displayed together for the first time, five 1770 engraved versions of the Boston Massacre including two by Revere.
Revolutionary Revere. A trunk owned by John Hancock which was rescued after the Battle of Lexington by Paul Revere. Lent by Worcester Historical Museum.
Revere the Maker. Several volumes of Revere's shop accounts, including his first records from 1761, are displayed in this section. Lent by Massachusetts Historical Society, Boston.
Revere the Maker. Examples of the variety of silver objects made by Revere at his silver shop in Boston.
Revere the Maker. Examples of the variety of silver objects made by Revere at his silver shop in Boston.
Revere the Maker. The Templeman tea service, 1792-1793, by Revere. Lent by Minneapolis Institute of Art.
Revere the Maker. Examples of the variety of silver objects made by Revere at his silver shop in Boston.
Revere the Maker. Co-curator of the exhibition Nan Wolverton, AAS, discusses the Templeman tea service.
Revere the Maker. A tankard, coffeepot, bowl, teaspoons and sugar urn made by Revere. Lent by Worcester Art Museum.
Revere the Maker. Lucretia Chandler Murray portrait by John Singleton Copley lent by Worcester Art Museum and a bronze mortar lent by Paul Revere Memorial Association.
Revere the Maker. Bronze courthouse bell cast by Revere, 1796, lent by Dedham Historical Society & Museum.
Revere the Maker. Looking back towards the Chandler Murray portrait.
Revere the Maker. Copper water kettle made with copper rolled at Revere's mill in Canton, lent by Historic Deerfield, Inc.
Revere the Maker. Case with copper-related material, including a letter book documenting Revere's trade and a copper spike.
Revere's Network. Overview.
Revere's Network. Objects related to Revere's Masonic and church networks.
Revere's Network. Objects related to Revere's Masonic and Loyalist networks.
Revere's Network. Masonic networks featuring Chinese export porcelain punch bowl, lent by Scottish Rite Masonic Museum & Library.
Revere's Network. Objects related to Revere's patriot networks.
Revere's Network. Objects related to both Revere's Loyalist and patriot networks.
Revere's Network. AAS portrait of William Paine hanging over a case with Paine family silver lent by Worcester Art Museum.
Revere's Network. Objects related to Revere's mercantile network, included a tall clock lent by Old Sturbridge Village.
Revere's Network. Winding instructions engraved by Revere with tall clock lent by Old Sturbridge Village.
Revere's Network. New-York Historical Society's portrait of New York merchant Harmon Hendricks with silver by Revere made for Moses Michael Hays, private collection.
Revere's Legend. AAS objects related to the re-purposing of Revere's Boston Massacre, as well as sculpture by Cyrus Dallin of Revere on his midnight ride from the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston.
Revere's Legend. Portraits of Paul and Rachel Revere in later life lent by Massachusetts Historical Society, with AAS objects and N.C. Wyeth's Paul Revere from 1922, lent by The Hill School.
Revere's Legend. Case with AAS 1830s and 1850s material related to depictions of the Boston Massacre based on Revere's 1770 print.
Revere's Legend. Objects related to American poet Henry Wadsworth Longfellow and the publication of his 1861 poem "Paul Revere." Also, Grant Wood's Midnight Ride of Paul Revere, 1931, lent by the Metropolitan Museum of Art.
Revere's Legend. New-York Historical Society's bust of Longfellow by Daniel Chester French, with Grant Wood's Midnight Ride of Paul Revere, 1931, lent by the Metropolitan Museum of Art.
Revere's Legend. Grant Wood's Midnight Ride of Paul Revere, 1931, lent by the Metropolitan Museum of Art and case with first printing of Longfellow's poem.
Revere's Legend. Twentieth-century publications showing the legend of Revere as a midnight rider.
Revere's Legend. Twentieth-century publications showing the legend of Revere as a midnight rider.

 

For a closer look

Step closer to the exhibition cases by visiting the AAS online version of Beyond Midnight below


Revolutionary Revere
Americans remember Paul Revere for his midnight expedition in April 1775, warning residents the British troops were on the march to Lexington and Concord. Yet that dramatic ride was just a small part of his role in the Revolution.



Revere the Maker
Paul Revere began working with his hands at an early age, apprenticing as a silversmith in his father’s shop at 13. When his father died six years later, young Paul took over the enterprise.



Revere's Network
The son of an immigrant artisan, Paul Revere belonged to an economic class called “mechanics,” considered below merchants, lawyers, and clergymen. But what he lacked in social status he made up for by cultivating influential connections, raising his position through savvy networking.



Revere the Legend
Paul Revere died in 1818, but his fame as a craftsman endured. His son expanded the Revere copper mill, keeping alive the family’s reputation for metalworking. But in the 1830s, Paul Revere’s legacy took a new turn.


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