Programs > Academic Programs > History of the Book > 2010 Summer Seminar in the History of the Book

American Antiquarian Society
Summer Seminar in the History of the Book Syllabus

Sunday, June 13- Friday, June 18, 2010

 

-Syllabus-

This syllabus may be subject to change.

Sunday, June 13: Welcome and Introductions

4:30-6:00 Welcome and collections overview
6:00-8:00Drinks and dinner

 

Monday, June 14: Southern Scales of Print

9:00-10:00 Welcome and introductions
10:15-12:00 Seminar 1:
Conceptualizing the Global American South and Early American Print Culture

Assigned readings:

  • Wallerstein, Immanuel. "What Can One Mean by Southern Culture?" The Evolution of Southern Culture. Ed. Numan V. Bartley. Athens: U of Georgia P, 1988. 1-13.
  • O'Brien, Michael. "Chaotic Order of Books." Conjectures of Order: Intellectual Life and the American South, 1810-1860. Volume I. Chapel Hill: U of North Carolina P, 2004. 472-526.
  • McGill, Meredith. "Copyright." A History of the Book in America: The Industrial Book, 1840-1880. Volume 3. Ed. Scott E. Casper et al. Chapel Hill: U of North Carolina P, 2007. 158-78.
  • Winship, Michael. "International Trade in Books." A History of the Book in America: The Industrial Book, 1840-1880. Volume 3. Ed. Scott E. Casper et al. Chapel Hill: U of North Carolina P, 2007. 148-58.
  • Loughran, Trish. "U.S. Print Culture: The Factory of Fragments." The Republic in Print: Print Culture in the Age of U.S. Nation Building, 1770-1870. New York: Columbia UP, 2007. 1-29.

Recommended readings:

  • Aboul-Ela, Hosam. "Global South, Local South: The New Post-nationalism in U.S. Southern Studies." American Literature (December 2006) 78: 847-858.
  • Smith, Jon and Deborah Cohn. "Introduction: Uncanny Hybridities:" Look Away! The U.S. South in New World Studies. Ed. Jon Smith and Deborah Cohn. Durham: Duke UP, 2004. 1-24.
  • Wallerstein, Immanuel. "Historical Origins of World-Systems Analysis: From Social Science Disciplines to Historical Social Science." World-Systems Analysis: An Introduction. Durham: Duke UP, 2004. 1-22.
  • Winship, Michael and Jeffrey D. Groves. "The National Book Trade System." A History of the Book in America: The Industrial Book, 1840-1880. Volume 3. Ed. Scott E. Casper et al. Chapel Hill: U of North Carolina P, 2007. 117-147.
12:00-1:15 Lunch
1:30-4:45 Archival experience A: Traffic in Print, Traffic in Slaves

Assigned readings:

  • Hall, David D. "The Chesapeake in the Seventeenth Century." Cultures of Print: Essays in the History of the Book. Amherst: U of Massachusetts P, 1996. 97-150.
  • Grimes, William. Life of William Grimes, the Runaway Slave (1825)
  • Whittier, John Greenleaf. Preface. Narrative of James Williams (1838). iii-xxiv.
  • "Alabama Beacon versus James Williams." Emancipator. Aug. 30, 1838.

Recommended readings:

  • Winton, Calhoun. "The Southern Book Trade in the Eighteenth Century." A History of the Book in America: The Colonial Book in the Atlantic World. Vol. I. Ed. Hugh Amory and David D. Hall. Chapel Hill: U of North Carolina P, 2007. 224-46

 

Tuesday June 15: A Mudsill Book History?

9:00-12:00 p.m. Seminar 2:
Labor, Sectionalism, Politics & Literature: A Mudsill Book History?

Guest Faculty: Robert E. Bonner, Assoc. Prof. of History, Dartmouth College

Assigned readings:

  • Hammond, James Henry. "'Mud-Sill' Speech." Selections from the Letters and Speeches of the Hon. James H. Hammond of South Carolina, with an introduction and notes by Clyde N. Wilson (Spartanburg, S.C. : Reprint Co., 1978; reprint New York : J.F. Trow, 1866).
  • Faust, Drew Gilpin. A Sacred Circle: The Dilemma of the Intellectual in the Old South, 1840-1860. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins UP, 1977. x-xii.
  • Cornelius, Janet Duitsman. "Slaves, Religion and Reading in Early North America." When I Can Read My Title Clear: Literacy, Slavery, and Religion in the Antebellum South. Columbia: U of South Carolina P, 1991. 11-36.
  • Loughran, Trish. "Abolitionist Nation: The Space of Organized Abolition." The Republic in Print: Print Culture in the Age of U.S Nation Building, 1770-1870. New York: Columbia UP, 2007. 303-10; 344-354; 360-61.

Recommended readings:

  • Emerson, Ralph Waldo. "The American Scholar."
  • Bonner, Robert E. Mastering America: Southern Slaveholders and the Crisis of American Nationhood. Cambridge: Cambridge UP, 2009. Chapter 3, "Republican Masters and American Mission." 81-113.
  • Brophy, Alfred L. "'A Revolution which Seeks to Abolish Law, Must End Necessarily in Despotism': Louisa McCord and Antebellum Southern Legal Thought." Cardozo Women's Law Journal 5.1 (1998): 33-77.
  • Faust, Drew Gilpin. A Sacred Circle: The Dilemma of the Intellectual in the Old South, 1840-1860. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins UP, 1977. ix-xii; 7-14; 87-111.
12:00-1:15Lunch
1:30-3:15 Archival Experience B: Southern Manifestos

Assigned readings:

  • Legaré, Hugh Swinton. "American Literature." Southern Review 7.14 (August 1831): 436-59.
  • Simms, William Gilmore. "Southern Literature." The Magnolia 3 (January 1841): 1-6; 3 (February 1841): 69-74. Rpt. in John Bassett, Defining Southern Literature: Perspectives and Assessments, 1831-1852 Madison: Farleigh Dickinson UP, 1997. 60-66.
  • [Whitaker, Daniel.] "The Newspaper and Periodical Press." Southern Quarterly Review (January 1842): 5-66.
  • "Southern Literature." Putnam's Monthly Magazine 9.50 (February 1857): 207-14.
  • "Editor's Table." Southern Literary Messenger 24.3 (Mar. 1857): 236.
  • Timrod, Henry. "Literature in the South." Russell's Magazine 5 (August 1859): 385-95.

Recommended readings:

  • Bassett, John. Introduction. Defining Southern Literature: Perspectives and Assessments, 1831-1852. Ed. John Bassett. Madison: Farleigh Dickinson UP, 1997. 15-25
  • Belasco, Susan. "The Cultural Work of National Magazines." The History of the Book in America. Vol. 3: The Industrial Book, 1840-1880. Ed. Scott E. Casper et al. Chapel Hill: U of North Carolina P, 2007. 258-69.
3:30-5:00Individual meeting with seminar leaders

 

Wednesday June 16: Beyond a Domestic, Dependent Print Culture

9:00-10:30 p.m. Seminar 3:
Elias Boudinot and the Cherokee Phoenix

Assigned readings:

  • Perdue, Theda, ed. Cherokee Editor: The Writings of Elias Boudinot. Knoxville: U of Tennessee P, 1996. "Selected Contributions to Periodicals in the United States, 41-63; "An Address to the Whites," 65-83; "Selections from the Cherokee Phoenix," 87-97.
  • Patricia Galloway, "Debriefing Explorers Amerindian Information in the Delisles. Mapping of the Southeast." Cartographic Encounters: Perspectives on Native American Mapmaking and Map Use. Chicago: U of Chicago P, 1998. Ed. G. Malcolm Lewis. 223-40.
  • Warhus, Mark. Chapter 4, "The Remapping of America." Another America: Native American Maps and the History of Our Land. New York: St. Martin's P, 1997. 138-68.

Recommended readings:

  • Perdue, Theda, ed. Cherokee Editor: The Writings of Elias Boudinot. Knoxville: U of Tennessee P, 1996. Introduction, 3-38.
  • McKenzie, D.F. "The Sociology of a Text: Orality, Literacy and Print in Early New Zealand," The Library 6, 6th Ser. (December 1984): 333-65.
  • Gregory A. Waselkov, "Indian Maps of the Colonial Southeast: Archaeological Implications and Prospects." Cartographic Encounters: Perspectives on Native American Mapmaking and Map Use. Chicago: U of Chicago P, 1998. Ed. G. Malcolm Lewis. 205-21.
  • Hershberger, Mary. "Mobilizing Women, Anticipating Abolition: The Struggle against Indian Removal in the 1830s." The Journal of American History 86.1 (June 1999): 15-40.
10:30-10:45 p.m. Break
10:45-12:00Discussion continued
12:00-1:30Lunch
1:30-4:00 Seminar 4:
Multilingulaism and the Global South

Assigned readings:

  • Sollors, Werner. "After the Culture Wars; or, From 'English Only' to 'English Plus'." Multilingual America: Transnationalism, Ethnicity, and the Languages of American Literature. Ed. Werner Sollors. New York: New York UP, 1998. 1-13.
  • Gruesz, Kirsten Silva. "'Alone with the Terrible Hurricane': The Occluded History of Transamerican Literature." Ambassadors of Culture: The Transamerican Origins of Latino Writing. Princeton, NJ: Princeton UP, 2002. 1-29.
  • Cohen, Matt. "Introduction." The Networked Wilderness: Communicating in Early New England. Minneapolis: U of Minnesota P, 2010. 1-28.
4:30-8:00 Library open late tonight only

 

Thursday, June 17: Nations Within and Beyond the Nation

9:00-12:00 Archival experience D: Les Cenelles and the Tinker Collection

Assigned readings:

  • Fabre, Michel. "The New Orleans Press and French-Language Literature by Creoles of Color." Multilingual America: Transnationalism, Ethnicity, and the Languages of American Literature. Ed. Werner Sollors. New York: New York UP, 1998. 29-49.
  • Gruesz, Kirsten Silva. "The Mouth of a New Empire: New Orleans in the Transamerican Print Trade." Ambassadors of Culture: The Transamerican Origins of Latino Writing. Princeton, NJ: Princeton UP, 2002. 108-60.
  • Lanusse, Armand, ed. Les Cenelles: Choix de poésies indigène. 1845. Trans. Régine Latortue and Gleason R. W. Adams. Boston: G. K. Hall & Co., 1979.

Recommended readings:

  • Bell, Caryn Cossé. "Romanticism, Social Protest, and Reform." In Revolution, Romanticism, and the Afro-Creole Protest Tradition in Louisiana 1718-1868. Baton Rouge: Louisiana State UP, 1997. 89-136.
  • Jumonville, Florence. "'The Art Preservative of All Arts': Early Printing in New Orleans." In Printmaking in New Orleans. Ed. Jesse J. Poesch. New Orleans: Historic New Orleans Collection, 2006. 87-101.
  • Roach, Joseph. "Introduction: History, Memory, and Performance." Cities of the Dead: Circum-Atlantic Performance. New York: Columbia UP, 1996. 1-32.
  • Thompson, Shirley Elizabeth. "Prologue: Passing as American" and "Establishing Propriety in the City of Sin." Exiles at Home: The Struggle to Become American in Creole New Orleans. Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard UP, 2009. 1-23; 164-209.
12:00-1:15Lunch and Meet to Drive to Pequot Museum
1:30-4:45Pequot Museum field trip

 

Friday, June 18: Final Thoughts

9:00-noon Seminar 5:
Reconceptualizing the Global American South and Early American Print Culture

Recommended readings:

  • Dimock, Wai Chee. "World History According to Katrina." differences: A Journal of Feminist Cultural Studies 19.2 (2008): 35-53.
noonLunch and goodbye