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Proceedings of the American Antiquarian Society Volumes 112-115

Volume 115, Part 2 (2005)
Contains the Proceedings of the Semiannual Meeting in October 2005, the Report of the Council, obituaries of recently deceased members, and the following articles:
  • "The Emerging Media of Early America" by Sandra M. Gustafson. Pages 205-50.
    Electronic media are reshaping our understanding of what texts are, how they produce meaning, and how verbal forms affect society and culture. The 2005 Wiggins Lecture examines common assumptions about the history of verbal technologies and offers new ways of thinking about the emergent properties of textual media. Contrasting the printed medium with the allegedly static forms of oral performance and manuscript, media histories often focus on print as an emerging technology and an agent of social change. An alternative to print-driven media history considers how theories of technology and history are bound up with the ways that we talk about textual forms and suggests a perspective that better accounts for the complex evolution of verbal culture.
    Available as offprint number 1020
  • "From Microprint to Megapixels: The Fifty-Year Partnership between Readex and the American Antiquarian Society." Pages 231-316.
    Panelists representing AAS, Readex, and the scholarly and library communities discuss the past, present, and future of the AAS-Readex relationship. Introduced by Hench, the four papers trace the history of the technology underlying the current array of digital products, the association between Readex and AAS, and assess their impact on these organizations and on the worlds of librarianship and historical scholarship.
    • Introduction by John B. Hench. Pages 252-52.
    • "Albert Boni: A Sketch of a Life in Micro-Opaque" by August Imholtz, Jr. Pages 253-277.
    • "Into the Unknown in 1955 -- AAS and Readex" by Marcus A. McCorison. Pages 279-88.
    • "Cultures of Invention: Exploring Tom Paine and His Iron Bridge in the Digital Age" by Edward Gray. Pages 289-94.
    • "The Readex Corporation, the American Antiquarian Society, and the Brave New World of Electronic Text: A Librarian's Perspective" by Robert Scott. Pages 295-316.

    Available as offprint number 1021
  • "A New Bibliography of the Work of Wood Engraver and Illustrator Alexander Anderson" by Jane R. Pomeroy. Pages 317-40
    A recent Oak Knoll Press publication sponsored by the American Antiquarian Society is a comprehensive view of the work of Anderson by the bibliographer Jane R. Pomeroy. Anderson, the first skilled relief engraver in America, achieved a prodigious output covering subjects and publications including literature, separate prints and broadsides, children's books, ephemera and political cartoons, almanac advertisements and bookplates. Through the use of Anderson's proof books, Pomeroy has identified the images that he created and the publications for which they were commissioned, thereby revealing Anderson's status as an artist and master wood engraver.
    Available as offprint number 1022

 

Volume 115, Part 1 (2005)
Contains the Proceedings of the Semiannual Meeting in April 2005, the Report of the Council, obituaries of recently deceased members, and the following articles:

  • "Scribal Publication in Seventeenth-Century New England: An Introduction and Checklist" by David D. Hall. Pages 29-80.
    The reproduction and circulation of handwritten texts -- scribal publication -- played a significant role in the civil, religious, and literary culture of seventeenth-century New England. Although a printing office was established in Cambridge, Massachusetts, by the end of 1639 and another in Boston by 1674, scribal publication persisted alongside the efforts of these printers. The checklist including some eighty-four items represents a preliminary effort to identify a body of texts that were produced in this manner and to suggest some of the implications of this mode of publication for our understanding of politics and culture.
    Available as offprint number 1017
  • "A Long False Start: The Rejected Chapters of Cooper's 'The Bravo' (1831)" by Lance Schachterle. Pages 81-126.
    Cooper's manuscript of The Bravo at the American Antiquarian Society, the nearly complete, holograph rough draft of the entire novel, includes two chapters numbered by Cooper as XVIII and XIX (and the beginning of Chapter XX) that proved to be completely different from chapters 18 through 20 in the novel as published in 1831. This essay presents a diplomatic transcription of the two rejected chapters and the start of chapter XX, and speculates as to why Cooper rejected them in favor of the completely different chapters with which he replaced them.
    Available as offprint number 1018
  • "Davy Crockett is Dead, But How He Died Lives On" by Brenda Gunn. Pages 127-46.
    An account of Davy Crockett's death that differs from the popular version is found in the José Enrique de la Peña narrative that reports that Mexican soldiers captured Crockett and executed him. A thirty-year-old controversy that began 120 years after the Battle of the Alamo with the 1955 publication in Mexico City of Peña's memoir surrounds this document and its accounting of Crockett's death.
    Available as offprint number 1019

 

Volume 114, Part 2 (2004)
Contains the Proceedings of the Annual Meeting in October 2004, the Report of the Council, obituaries of recently deceased members, and the following articles:

  • "Magnalia Historiae Libri Americana; or, How AAS Brought the History of the Book into the New Millennium" by Philip F. Gura. Pages 249-80.
    In this, the twenty-fifth annual Wiggins Lecture, Gura traces the evolution of the program in the history of the book at the Society. He provides an overview of the lectures, show how David D. Hall's inaugural lecture offered what has turned to be a road map for the inauguration of a new field of study both at the Society and in the academy, generally. Gura reviews subsequent lectures in the series, summer seminars, and key publications concluding with a look into the future based on the premise that the history of the book, properly conceived and accomplished, leads to nothing less than new ways to view the history of American society and culture.
    Available as offprint number 1014
  • "Thomas Hutchinson In Context: The Ordeal Revisited" by Bernard Bailyn. Pages 281-300.
    Bernard Bailyn reviews his reasons for writing The Ordeal of Thomas Hutchinson, published in 1974, and concludes that, while still in agreement with his overall assessment of the last colonial governor, he evaluated Hutchinson's plight too narrowly. The local issues that trapped Hutchinson might have seemed like a problem of his own making, but turn out to have been part of a larger, transformational shift that was taking place in the Atlantic world. 1776 was not only the year of American independence, but also of the publication of works by authors such as Tom Paine, Edward Gibbon, Richard Price, Adam Smith, and Jeremy Bentham that pointed to the end of the ancien régime in Europe and later in Latin America. The first annual Robert C. Baron Lecture.
    Available as offprint number 1015
  • "Slavery Would Have Died of That Music.: The Hutchinson Family Singers and the Rise of Popular-Culture Abolitionism in Early Antebellum-Era America, 1842-1850" by Brian Roberts. Pages 301-68.
    The Hutchinsons were abolitionists and they were extremely popular at a time when the movement challenged traditions of American slavery and racism. Slavery was viewed as traditional, and radicalism had no place in America. Perhaps the last place one would expect to find abolitionism would be at the heart of American popular culture. Their story argues for a new approach to abolitionism, one that places it not on the "radical" margins of American politics or society but at the very center of American popular culture.

 

Volume 114, Part 1 (2004)
Contains the Proceedings of the Semiannual Meeting in April 2004, the Report of the Council, obituaries of recently deceased members, and the following articles:

  • "'Such is Change in California': James Mason Hutchings and the Print Metropolis, 1854-1862" by Jen A. Huntley-Smith. Pages 35-86.
    A gold-rush emigrant from England, James Mason Hutchings spent the 1850s traveling through the central and northern California. He recorded his impressions of the economic and social changes in his diary and, by establishing a publishing business in San Francisco, attempted to use print culture to effect further changes by fostering visions of California as a place to settle rather than to plunder. Between 1853 and 1862, he published illustrated letter sheets for miners, magazines, almanacs, lithographic prints, and the illustrated monthly, Hutchings' California Magazine. This appraisal of Esther Forbes's Johnny Tremain (1943) describes the novel as a book about the uses of reading. The fictional adventures of an apprentice silversmith who lived in Boston, observed Paul Revere at work, listened to his impassioned clandestine speeches, and carried the word to the sexton of the Old North Church that he was to position two lanterns in the steeple on the night of April 18, 1775, are well known to several generations of readers. As the story unfolds, considerations of the value of silver and of reading reveal ultimately that literacy, not wealth, will create the informed citizenry that will sustain the new republic.
    Available as offprint number 1012
  • "Models of Agency: Frederick Douglass and 'The Heroic Slave'" by Cynthia S. Hamilton. Pages 87-135.
    In the novella "The Heroic Slave" Frederick Douglass explores African American heroism and various models of agency available to him for the depiction of liberation, liberators, and sentimental appeals for assistance. A vehicle for Douglass to describe his split with Garrison, it becomes his own declaration of independence and a means to expose the cultural politics of benevolence within antislavery culture. "The Heroic Slave" enabled Douglass to explore the personal politics of interracial cooperation within the antislavery movement and the cultural politics of agency within antislavery rhetoric. Available as offprint number 1011
  • "Martha Buck's Copybook: New England Tragedy Verse and the Scribal Lineage of the American Ballad Tradition" by Daniel A. Cohen. Pages 137-86
    North America's earliest enduring tradition of indigenous balladry emerged out of the highly literate folk culture that flourished in New England, and elsewhere in the Northeast, from the second half of the eighteenth century. This essay examines the process by which topical poems inspired by local tragedies--including some of America's earliest homegrown ballads--were composed, transmitted, and preserved in print and manuscript form, focusing on a small but exemplary group of old tragedy verses that a Connecticut farmer's daughter wrote into her copybook during the 1820s and 1830s. More broadly, Martha Buck's copybook challenges the conventional understanding of folk ballads as quintessential products of "oral culture" and the related view of the South as the natural seedbed of early American balladry.
    Available as offprint number 1013

 

Volume 113, Part 2 (2003)
Contains the Proceedings of the Annual Meeting in October 2004, the Report of the Council, obituaries of recently deceased members, and the following articles:

  • "Ornithology and Enterprise: Making and Marketing John James Audubon's The Birds of America" by Gregory H. Nobles. Pages 267-302.
    John James Audubon's double elephant folio edition of The Birds of America (4 vols., 1827-38), a massive work of natural history that offers the reader an innovative interplay between image and text still stands as one of the most remarkable artistic and scientific achievements in the history of the book. For Audubon, though, producing this "Great Work" proved to be as much about entrepreneurship as ornithology. The changes in the popular perception of Audubon's birds from his time to our own is the background for looking at the connection between the cultural and commercial significance of this big book about birds, which represents both an investigation of nature and an investment in art. The various ways people have valued Audubon's work leads to the question of whether The Birds of America is--or should be--a book at all.
    Available as offprint number 1009
  • "Worcester Through a Child's Eyes: The Diaries of Louisa Jane Trumbull, 1829-37" by Holly V. Izard. Pages 303-491.
    Diaries kept by Louisa Jane Trumbull from 1829 to 1837 are a rare and valuable resource, as few records kept by children have survived for study. Remarkable for the quality of their content, the journals offer an intimate and highly engaging connection with a past time and place through youthful eyes and sensibilities. Includes a transcription of Volume 1 of the diary: "L. J. Trumbull's Book: Louisa Jane Trumbull's First Journal, November 3, 1829-May 20, 1834," and four appendices. Clap, Lincoln, and Trumbull Genealogies, compiled by Holly V. Izard; Biographical Sketches of Individuals and Families Named in the Trumbull Diary, compiled by Holly V. Izard; Key to the Map of the Village of Worcester, July 1829, by Holly V. Izard; and A Reflection on Louisa Jane Trumbull's Book List and Annotated List, by Laura E. Wasowicz.
    Available as offprint number 1010

 

Volume 113, Part 1 (2003)
Contains the Proceedings of the Semiannual Meeting in April 2003, the Report of the Council, obituaries of recently deceased members, and the following articles:

  • "Silver Linings: Print and Gentility in the World of Johnny Tremain" by Joan Shelley Rubin. Pages 37-52
    This appraisal of Esther Forbes's Johnny Tremain (1943) describes the novel as a book about the uses of reading. The fictional adventures of an apprentice silversmith who lived in Boston, observed Paul Revere at work, listened to his impassioned clandestine speeches, and carried the word to the sexton of the Old North Church that he was to position two lanterns in the steeple on the night of April 18, 1775, are well known to several generations of readers. As the story unfolds, considerations of the value of silver and of reading reveal ultimately that literacy, not wealth, will create the informed citizenry that will sustain the new republic.
    Available as offprint number 1005
  • "History, Memory, and a House Museum Artemas Ward of Shrewsbury, Massachusetts
    • A Harvard Seminar Looks at the Wards" by Laurel Thatcher Ulrich. Pages 53-57
    • "Minutemen For Months: The Making of an American Revolutionary Army Before Washington, April 20-July 2, 1775" by Justin Florence. Pages 59-101.

    During the brief period that General Artemas Ward was in command, he and his fellow leaders made a drastic impact on the immediate course of events of the Revolution by shifting the attitudes, motivations, and mindsets of the New Englanders in military service. Men, who on April 20, 1776, rushed to defend their hometowns, had by July 2, when George Washington took command of the troops, become part of an American army that was engaged in a war with the British in defense of the life, liberty, and properties not just of their townsmen, but of all Americans.

  • "General Artemas Ward: A Forgotten Revolutionary Remembered and Reinvented, 1800-1938" by Rebecca Anne Goetz. Pages 103-134.
    Members of the Ward family of Shrewsbury, Massachusetts, employed a variety of techniques -- genealogies, biographies, paintings, mausoleums, and even statutes to memorialize their distinguished ancestor, the Revolutionary General Artemas Ward. For over a century after his death in 1800, Ward's descendants used his life and accomplishments in the complex creation of family, local, and ultimately national identity. The Wards are a unique and provocative case study in the uses of historical memory.
    Available as offprint number 1006

  • "Auctions and the Distribution of Law Books in Antebellum America" by M. H. Hoeflich. Pages 135-61.
    Traditional legal history has been doctrinal history interested in the content of books rather than in how such doctrines were made known to lawyers and the public. Law books got into circulation through booksellers and auctions of new and unsold stock and the libraries of lawyers. A survey of auction catalogues suggests their value in helping to reconstruct the intellectual milieu of the antebellum Bar.
    Available as offprint number 1007

  • "Geography, Pedagogy, and Race: Schoolbooks and Ideology in the Antebellum United States" by Anne Baker. Pages 163-99.
    This essay examines the media through which new ideas about race were disseminated in the antebellum period. Schoolbook authors, motivated both by pedagogical zeal and by the desire to sell more textbooks, began to organize geographical information according to categories such as "Rivers," "Mountains," and "Races of Men," rather than grouping such information under the heading of nations or regions. By encouraging students to conceptualize the world in new ways, these authors played a powerful role in predisposing Americans to accept new theories of race.
    Available as offprint number 1008

 

Volume 112, Part 2 (2002)
Contains the Proceedings of the Annual Meeting in October 2002, the Report of the Council, obituaries of recently deceased members, the index to Volume 112, and the following articles:

  • "Cultural Crossroads: Print and Reading in Eighteenth- and Nineteenth-Century Montreal" by Yvan Lamonde and Patricia Lockhart Fleming. Pages 231-67.
    From the establishment of its first press in 1776 when Fleury Mesplet arrived with a printer's commission from the Continental Congress, Montreal has been a dynamic center of cultural exchange and printing activity, a crossroads linking France, British North America, and the United States. Drawing upon two scholarly traditions and their respective approaches to book history--analytical bibliography theorized by Anglo-American researchers and the analysis of quantitative and documentary evidence developed by their French colleagues--the general editors of a 'History of the Book in Canada/Histoire du livre et de l'imprimé au Canada' demonstrate the use of material and cultural evidence for the study of printers and readers in early Canada.
    Available as offprint number 1002
  • "The Unexceptional Eloquence of Sarah Josepha Hale's "Lecturess'" by Granville Ganter. Pages 269-89.
    This interpretation of Sarah Hale's 1839 novel, The Lecturess, is based on a recovery of traditions of women's successful public oratory. Hale's novel is viewed as an endorsement of women's public speech, provided it is done on behalf of the public good. Hale's publication in Godey's of "Esther," a coded closet drama, in 1838 also legitimates women's public speech.
    Available as offprint number 1003
  • "The Imagined Republic: The Fenians, Irish American Nationalism, and the Political Culture of Reconstruction" by Mitchell Snay. Pages 291-313.
    The Irish American nationalist Fenian movement is situated in the political context of Reconstruction. Pointing out the similarities to freed people and conservative Southern whites in the early postwar period, it suggests the centrality of enfranchisement and democracy to movements of self-determination and ethnic autonomy during the Reconstruction era.
    Available as offprint number 1004

Volume 112, Part 1 (2002)
Contains the Proceedings of the Semiannual Meeting in April 2002, the Report of the Council, obituaries of recently deceased members, and the following articles:

  • "'This whole country have their hands full of Blood this day': Transcription and Introduction of an Antislavery Sermon Manuscript Attributed to the Reverend Samuel Hopkins" by Jonathan D. Sassi. Pages 29-92.
    In the latter half of 1776, the Reverend Samuel Hopkins of Newport, Rhode Island, preached a stirring antislavery sermon from Isaiah 1:15. A transcript of the twenty-eight-page manuscript is published here for the first time with an introductory essay that discusses how the sermon sheds important new light on the social and intellectual origins of Hopkins's abolitionism. The sermon reveals a combination of Hopkins's New Divinity Calvinism, his experiences living in Newport, his reading and correspondence from throughout the Atlantic world, and the libertarian rhetoric of the American Revolution, all of which he synthesized to produce this powerful antislavery jeremiad.
    Available as offprint number 999

  • "Another 'American Cruikshank' Found: John H. Manning and the New York Sporting Weeklies" by Helen Lefkowitz Horowitz. Pages 93-126.
    The sporting papers in New York in the early 1840s were filled with the witty and irreverent drawings of John H. Manning. A clever delineator from Boston, Manning moved to New York and worked in the shop of Robert H. Elton, known for his comic almanacs. Mannings farcical illustrations in the Whip, the Libertine, the Weekly Rake, and the Flash enable us to see important elements of the popular culture of their day, especially that segment created for the new male sporting life appearing on the streets of American cities in the era preceding the Civil War.
    Available as offprint number 1000

  • "The Nineteenth-Century Serial as a Collective Enterprise: Harriet Beecher Stowe's Uncle Tom's Cabin and Eugéne Sue's Les Mystéres de Paris by Claire Parfait. Pages 127-152.
    Two works serve as particularly striking mid-nineteenth century examples of the complex relationships between the writer, readers, editor, and, finally, book publisher of serialized novels: Eugéne Sue's Les Mystéres de Paris (1842-43) and Harriet Beecher Stowe's Uncle Tom's Cabin (1851-52). The periodicals in which the serializations appear offer significantly different environments for the production and reception of the fiction.
    Available as offprint number 1001

 

Volumes 108-111

 

 

 

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