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Genre and Physical Characteristics Terms
Used in the Online Catalog

A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

L

Labels.
Used for examples of printed labels such as those affixed to containers for commercial products. Not to be confused with Labels (Provenance).

Labels (Provenance).
Related term:
    Paper labels (Binding).
Narrower terms:
    Binders' tickets (Binding).
    Bookplates (Provenance).
    Booksellers' labels (Provenance).

Lacquered bindings (Binding).

Large paper printings (Printing).

Leather bindings (Binding).
Related term:
    Vellum bindings (Binding).

Leather fore-edge (Binding).

Legislative addresses / [year delivered].

Lettering pieces (Binding).
"A synonym for LABEL when made of leather."UCarter, ABC.

Letters.
Used for substantial collections of letters. Not used for individual letters.

Library catalogues / [state] / [city].

Library circulation records (Provenance).

Library copies (Provenance).
Used for copies owned by institutions and formal private libraries as opposed to personal collections.

Library rules.

Limericks.

Limitation statements (Publishing).
A printed (or, rarely, hand-written) certificate stating how many copies of an edition of a book, or of a particular part of an edition, have been printed. (Carter, ABC for Book Collectors)
Limp bindings (Binding).
Used for a flexible binding of leather, cloth, or other material, but not of paper or cardboard. See also the local terms "Printed stiffened paper bindings" and "Stiffened paper bindings." RT Stiffened paper bindings (Binding) Wrappers (Binding). Use also one of the broader terms: Cloth bindings Leather bindings Publishers' cloth bindings Vellum bindings.

Literary hoaxes.
Used also for non-literary materials spuriously attributed to an individual for political, propagandistic, or other purposes.

Lithographs.
Narrower terms:
    Chromolithographs.
    Lithotints.
Lithotints.
Monochromatic lithographs printed from a single stone to which washes have been applied in different strengths to produce the appearance of a wash drawing. Introduced in the 1840s. Do not confuse with lithographs which have a background tint produced from a second stone.
Broader term:

Liturgical books.

Local histories.
Consider a work to be a "local history" if it meets the following criteria:
a. The work must have been created with a conscious historical purpose at least a year after the events described [this excludes contemporaneous accounts of significant events].
b. The work must have as its primary focus a particular locale. [A biography should not generally be considered a local history, even if the subject spent most of his or her life in the same locale; its primary focus is the person, not the locale.] This locale will often be a city or town, or may be smaller than a city or town. Consider a work dealing with a locale comprising two or three towns, or a geographical area falling within the boundaries of two or three towns, to be a local history. Consider the history of a county, whether a single narrative or a collection of narratives of individual cities and town, to be a county history, and assign the genre term 'County histories.'

M
 

 

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Last updated December 2, 2002