Folder 16 - Folder 30

 

 

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Folder 16
A Sailors Marriage.
[1805];  Woodward Delin. Pub. May 25 1805 by R. Ackermann N101 Strand; Rowlandson Scul. [No BM Number] (31 x 41 cm).

Colored engraving which features four figures. To the far left is a busty woman, possibly pregnant, arm-in-arm with a large man in a sailor’s uniform. He has his hat tucked under his arm and is saying “Why you white wig’d Lubber-what do you mean by that-do you doubt the word of a sailor-what did I tow her here for do you think? is there not a young Jack Tar in the midships!! I tell you she shall ride safe at Anchor as long as I live and when I die his Majesty (heaven bless him) King George the third will take her into keeping.” To the right are two men; a large nearsighted man in a large wig and white robes reads from a book/pamphlet with the word “Matrimony” across the top. To the right is a surprised-looking younger man in black dropping a book.

 

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Folder 17
Two-Penny Whist.
[1796]; Js. Gy. Ad vivam fect. Pubd Jany nu 1796 by H. Humphrey New Bond Street. [BM 8885A] (34 x 46 cm).

Colored engraving featuring an interior scene at a card table. Seated at the table are two men and two women. To the left, a woman in a floral dress with a long nose smiles at a surprised looking man to her right; she discloses a club card. Seated behind is an old woman with spectacles; to the right is an African American man holding cards. In front is a man with a long ponytail, large nose, blue coat and long tails peering down at his cards.

 

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Folder 18
The Jew Beauties.
[1806]; Publish’d Augt 12, 1806 by Laurie & Whittle, 53, Fleet Street, London. [BM 10681] (31 x 22.5 cm).

Colored engraving on top of a ballad. The engraving is of an interior scene where two people, a man and a woman, are involved in a confrontation. A well-dressed man is to the left and holds his hat in his hands pulling backwards. To the right is a well-dressed woman with gloves on in boxing stance attempting to fight the man. On the wall are three framed prints. Two feature boxing scenes and one features a shirtless man entitled “The game Chicken”. The ballad beneath subtitled, “A Whimsical Song; -Sung by Mr. Fawcett, at Covent Garden Theatre.” The first line starts, “First, dere vash Miss Devy, pretty Miss Devy, Oh!” vat a Miss Devy was she!”

 

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Folder 19
The Man that Wanted to Know whether he was a witch or no, a famous old Lancashire Ballad.
[1806]; Publish’d Sept 8, 1806 by Laurie & Whittle, 53 Fleet Street, London. [No BM Number] (30.5 x 24 cm).

Colored engraving on top of a ballad. The engraving is of an interior scene where three men sit around a table with a green tablecloth. A central, stout man has his arm tucked in his vest pocket and is wearing spectacles. Before him is an open book and two quills. There is also a copy of a book entitled “Coke upon Lytleton” and a paper labeled “Surry”. To the right are two standing men. One has his hat in his hands and is being kicked by an additional man with his hand on his shoulder. This man is wearing long black robes and has a tall staff. The first line of the poem starts: “In Lancashire, there lived a man…”

 

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Folder 20
Company shocked at a Lady getting up to Ring the Bell.
[1804]; London Publish’d November 20t 1804 by H Humphrey No 27 St James’s Street. [BM 10303] (33 x 45 cm).

Colored engraving featuring an elaborate interior scene. To the right is a woman in a long yellow gown pulling a cord above a mantle to the far right. On top of the mantle are candlesticks and a framed portrait of cupid. The woman is holding her outstretched arm towards a table filled with men to the left. The hem of the woman’s skirt is being torn by a chair in the foreground. The table is in disarray; there is a small dog biting the knee of a man in military uniform, another man falling forward with a bun in his mouth and a knife in his hand, a third man in the back holding his hands to his face, another man pokes some meat and a fork in his eye while a fifth man with wide eyes attempts to stop the woman. Falling over the floor from the disheveled table is a steaming urn, china, pots, spoons, cups and saucers. To the left is a closed doorway.

 

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Folder 21
Paddy M’Shane’s Seven Ages.
[1807]; Publish’d Apr. 6 1807 by Laurie & Whittle, 53 Fleet Street, London; Cruikshank Del. [BM 10944] (30 x 22.5 cm).

Colored engraving with a ballad beneath subtitled “Written by Major Downs; and sung, with unbounded Applause, by Mr. Johnstone, at the Theatre Royal, Drury Lane.” Image features an interior scene with an old man seated in a chair with his mouth open; the man is wearing a cap, spectacles, is frail and thin. In front of him is a young Irishman with a striped bundle over his shoulder looking at the viewer. Behind them is a pot on a fire, a cat in a nook, and to the right a cow and a large pig. CPDBM notes that the interior is that of an Irish cabin and the text is a travesty of Shakespeare’s “All the World’s a stage.” First line of text reads: “If my own botheration don’t alter my plan…”

 

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Folder 22
Paddy’s Ramble Through London.
[1806]; Publish’d Octr 1. 1806 by Laurie & Whittle. 53 Fleet Street, London. [BM 10686] (30.5 x 23 cm).

Colored engraving with a ballad beneath subtitled “By the Author of the Yorkshire Man in London; or Humphrey Hobnail’s return from the Play.”  Image features an exterior scene outside the tower of London. To the left are three guards, two standing in a doorway and one with a pointed pike extended towards an additional man to the right. The man is well-dressed and is pulling away from the tip of the pike. On the battlements to the left is an additional guard. Text beneath is divided into 9 stanzas. The first line starts: “My name’s Paddy Whack I came up to this town…”

 

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Folder 23
Metallic-Tractors.
[1801]; J. Gillray, inv & fect London; Publish’d Novr 11. 1801, by H. Humphrey, 27, St. James’s Street. [BM 9761] (33.5 x 41.5 cm).

Colored aquatint with engraving which features a robust man seated in an elaborate pink chair with a dog looking up at him. The man is having a small pointed instrument inserted into his nose; flames shoot out his nose, his teeth and fists are clenched and he is in visible pain. The man holding the instrument also holds the man’s forehead and knocks off his wig. This second man is tall and thin and has a pin in his mouth; his face is focused. On the table beside him is a steaming jug, a bowl of ice, a pipe with ashes and a document entitled “The True Briton” as well as a steaming goblet of liquid with a spoon inside. Mounted on the wall is an image of the infant Bacchus holding a bottle of wine and goblet. Additional copy in European Political Print Collection Box 4 Folder 1.

 

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Folder 24
Barny Leave the Girl Alone.
[1806]; Publish’d Octr 24 1806 by Laurie & Whittle, 53 Fleet Street, London. [No BM Number] (29.5 x 22.5 cm).

Colored engraving with ballad beneath. The ballad is subtitled “As sung by Mr. Johannot, in London, Dublin, Liverpool, Birmingham, &c. with Unbounded Applause _ The words by Mr. Upton _ (Time Molly put the Kettle on). Image features an interior domestic scene with three figures. To the left is a hearth with a tea kettle and a table with several settings of tea, cups and saucers. Central in the scene is a man grabbing the waist of a young woman. To the right is a cross-looking woman holding a bottle and a club with her arm raised. To the far right is a wicker cradle with a blanket. Through the doorway to the right is a street scene with buildings. The ballad is divided into four stanzas and the first line is: “Judy leads me such a life…”

 

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Folder 25
Poll of Horselydown. Sung by Mr. Grimaldi, at Sadler’s Wells.
[1807]; Publish’d Jany 20 1807 by Laurie & Whittle, 53 Fleet Street, London. [BM 10937] (30.5 x 23 cm).

Colored engraving with ballad beneath. The scene is an exterior street scene with three figures. On the cobblestone street in the center is a fallen, angry looking man in military uniform. He is looking upwards at a young man who is carrying a large turtle on his head and shoulders. To the right is a young woman in a golden empire dress casting her eyes backwards towards the young man; she has on a white veil. Behind them is a brick building labeled “Burr Street”. The ballad is divided into four stanzas with the first line: “Ye landsmen, and ye seamen, be you a-head or a-stern…”

 

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Folder 26
Easing the Tooth-ach.
[1796]; Pubd May 7th 1796 by H. Humphrey New Bond Street; Engrav’d by T.As. [BM 8909] (33.5 x 22.5 cm).

Colored engraving featuring two men. One man is sitting on a stool and is in visible pain; he is holding his shin in his hands and has his other foot twisted uncomfortably. A second standing man with a larger stomach is holding the first man’s mouth open and removing a tooth with an extractor or device, focusing intently. Both men are wearing white wigs; the image is bordered in a rectangle in gold.

 

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Folder 27
Gentle Emetic.
[1804]; Publish’d Jany 28th 1804 by H. Humphrey St. James’s Street. [BM 10304] (33.5 x 23.5 cm).

Colored engraving featuring an interior scene. Image features a seated man in visible pain in a chair with slippers; he is having his head massaged by a standing man who is frowning. On the table is a bowl, a tea kettle, a cup with liquid and a bottle of medicine.

 

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Folder 28
A Smile to A Tear.
[1807]; Cruikshank’s Del; Publish’d March 2, 1807 by Larie & Whittle, 53 Fleet Street, London. [BM 10939] (30 x 23.5 cm).

Colored engraving with ballad beneath which is subtitled “Sung with unbounded applause, by Mr. Braham, in the New Opera, call’d ‘False Alarms, or My Cousin; Theatre Royal Drury Lane.” Image features a seated woman in a pink dress at a spinet piano called “Broderip”; she has been crying and is holding a handkerchief. Standing in front of her is a sinister looking man with his hands on his hips wearing a black military uniform. To the right is an additional chair. The ballad is divided into four stanzas and the first starts: “Said a Smile to a Tear…”

 

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Folder 29
Miss Wrinkle.
[1807]; Published March 12, 1807, by Laurie and Whittle, 53 Fleet Street, London; [I.] Cruikshanks Del. [BM 10940] (30.5 x 22.5 cm).

Colored engraving with ballad beneath which is subtitled “As sung by Miss Tyrer, with unbounded Applause, at the Theatre Royal, Covent Garden, in the popular Farce, of Arbitration or Free & Easy. Written by G. Nicks.” Image features a woman in an attic kneeling with her hands in front of her, eyes cast upwards. She has a despondent look on her face, is wearing a golden dress and kerchief with bow. Behind her is hanging a bonnet, green dress and washbowl; to the right is a vanity and mirror. Skulking through the floorboards in the front left is a brown and orange tiger cat. On the floor in front of the woman is a pamphlet entitled “Sorrows of Werter”. Peering at the woman through a hole in the thatched roof is a young man to the left. Ballad is divided into three stanzas; the first starts: “In a Village there liv’d An old Maid…”

 

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Folder 30
Breathing a vein.
[1804]; Published Jany 28th 1804 by H. Humphrey St. James’s Street. London. [BM 10306] (30 x 23 cm).

Colored engraving bordered in a black and gold rectangle. Image features a seated man and a standing man. The seated man is on a stool to the left and has one hand clutching his knee and is in visible discomfort, he is frowning, eyes cast down and is looking away. He is wearing a nightcap and a gold vest. The standing man to the right is holding a bowl and is bleeding the man’s other arm into it, a tourniquet tied to his upper forearm. He is wearing a long brown coat, boots with spurs, has wide eyes and puckered lips.

 


This site last updated: December 2009

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