Folder 1 - Folder 15

 

 

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Folder 1
Thomas Jefferson.
[1800]; Scoles, John (ca. 1772-1853). (46 x 29.5 cm). Link to CAEP record.

Engraving featuring a bust portrait of Jefferson facing right, eyes turned towards the viewer. The portrait is set in an oval and surrounded by a rectangle. On the bottom is an eagle with shield and ribbon inscribed “E. Pluribus Unum” and the text “Thomas Jefferson President of the United States of America. Published by I. Scoles A 92 Water St. New York.”

 

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Folder 2
A Philosophic Cock.
[n.d.]; [Akin, James (ca. 1773-1846)]. (42 x 33.5 cm). Link to Voyager record. Link to CAEP Record.

Hand-colored engraving with aquatint featuring a caricature of the figures of Sally Hemings and Thomas Jefferson on a bed of straw. To the left is the head and face of Jefferson on the body of a rooster/cock with large tail feathers. To the right is the head and face of Sally Hemmings with a white scarf wrapped around her head looking at Jefferson on the body of a black hen/chicken. Text above reads “Tis not a set of features or complexion or tincture of a skin that I admire.”

 

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Folder 3
The Bloody Arena.
[1806]; Akin, James (ca. 1773-1846). (34 x 40.5 cm). Link to CAEP record.

Hand-colored engraving which features an interior scene of a balance beam at the top labeled “Dearborn’s Patent” and to the right the uniformed body of Captain Henry Whitby hanging by a noose. To the left are numerous bodies of sailors hanging, their feet tangling and arms tied behind their backs. Between them are numerous broadsides pinned to the wall. Beneath them is a large crowd of men and women carrying the prostrate body of John Pierce on a stretcher with blood on his face. Two men bearing the stretcher are in front of a large marble staircase. Some in the crowd weep, others pray, some gesture and some speak. Text at the bottom reads “Independentiam Vestram Veneramini, vet omnis Natio vos Concacabit ad tibitum Submitted to the opinions of every descendant of 1776 by their friend and Countryman James Akin.”

 

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Folder 4
A Bug-a-boo to frighten John Bull, or the Wright mode for kicking up a Bubbery.
[1806]; Akin, James (ca. 1773-1846). [BM 10626] (35 x 45.5 cm). Link to CAEP record.

Hand-colored engraving which features an exterior marine scene with a ship with large mast and sails. Facing the viewer is the stern of the ship labeled “Wright of Maryland” with numerous men on top, most of them arguing and some physically fighting with a gun and a pot. In the distance is the hull of a ship with a British flag and in the far distance a British ship, wharf and dock. To the left is a captain with Napoleonic hat holding the rudder of a small ship and a sword. There are six men in his ship, one assisting a man who has fallen overboard. Additional text beneath reads “for 200 Dollars Bounty and 60 Dollars a month, with other important Perquisites!”

 

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Folder 5
The Prairie Dog sickened at the Sting of the Hornet or a Diplomatic Puppet exhibiting his Deceptions.
[1803?]; Akin, James (ca. 1773-1846). (34 x 46 cm). Link to CAEP record.

Hand-colored engraving featuring a caricature of Thomas Jefferson and Napoleon Bonaparte; Jefferson has the body of a hound with visible genitals vomiting up coins labeled “Two Millions” with gas excreting from his backside; to the left in the air is Napoleon with signature hat and large feather with the body of a hornet and large stinger pointed towards the rear of Jefferson. To the right is a man with coat and breeches with arms outstretched holding maps of West and East Florida. He says “A gull for the People” and emerging from his back pocket is “Instructions Ch: Mau: Talleyrand”; the ground underneath Jefferson is signed “J Akin fect”.

 

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Folder 6
Infuriated Despondency!
[1805]; Akin, James (ca. 1773-1846). (20 x 16 cm). Link to CAEP record.

Hand-colored wood engraving of a caricature of Edmund M. Blunt. In the image, Blunt is wearing a blue coat with long tails, has one elbow cocked, is wearing white pants and shirt and is holding a skillet by the handle over his head. His teeth are clenched and his eyes are wide; he is hunched slightly forward to the right. Text at top reads “Plate 1 No 13.” and beneath “Designed, Engraved & Published by James Akin Newburyport, Where writing-book covers may be had. Entered according to Law, June 1st 1805”.

 

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Folder 7
A Confidential Intrigue!!!
[1805]; Akin, James (ca. 1773-1846). (20 x 16.5 cm). Link to CAEP record.

Hand-colored engraving of a caricature of Edmund M. Blunt and a demon. In the image, Blunt is in the foreground on one knee with a fist raised over his head. He shouts “I will follow up the rascal until I see him Peeping thro the gates of a Jail!”; his hair and eyes are wild and his teeth are clenched. Before him is a broken skillet pan labeled “Knee-pan ware”; the devil which looks over his shoulder is thin, has a human face and states “your skillet’s broke your bond you’ll have to pay Unless by my advice the fool will run away”; protruding from the head of the devil is a pole labeled “Imperial Pole”. Shakespeare quotation at the top reads “Description cannot suit itself in words, To demonstrate the heart of such a wretch!”; text at bottom reads “Entered According to At of Congress June 1 1085 [sic] by James Akin, Engraver, Newburyport, Massachusetts”.

 

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Folder 8
An Edict from Saint Peter.
[1805]; Akin, James (ca. 1773-1846). (20.5 x 15.5 cm). Link to CAEP record.

Hand-colored engraving featuring an exterior scene of a young boy in front of St. Peter. St. Peter in robes and halo, is emerging from an entryway of a lodge; to the left is a column. In front of him is a nervous looking young boy with a red coat on with long tails and high boots who says “Rascals”. He is standing over a document labeled, “Report of the Committee of St. Peters Lodge”. St. Peter states “My Son, your general demeanor at sundry times has been such as indicates a want of that respect for my house which you ought to feel and manifest and your language the most abusive & slanderous against your brothers Abraham, Angier and David, no longer entitle you to admittance within this door!”; advertisement at top reads “Book Covers by the 100 or 1000 to be had of J. Akin Engraver Vol. 1 No. 8”. Remainder of title beneath reads “or the effects of being a naughty boy. A lesson for all good boys. Entered According to Act of Congress June 1st 1805 by James Akin Engraver.”

 

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Folder 9
All in my eye!
[1806]; Akin, James (ca. 1773-1846). (32.5 x 33 cm). Link to CAEP record.

Hand-colored engraving featuring an interior scene. Seated is a man with a cape tied around his neck being shaved by a barber stating “’Tis not nonsense, in my eye tho’!” In front of him is a tall, thin man holding a barber’s brush and container of shaving cream. He is stating “pshaw! Nonsense! Philotechnus may write against Mr. Perkin’s stereotype but ‘tis all in my eye!” he is looking at an unfolded newspaper before him which he is reading. The paper is the Newburyport Herald dated March 7, 1806 and a pamphlet on top entitled “An Examination &c by Philotechnus.” Facing the front of the store are multi-paned windows and, at the rear, a wall covered with satirical prints and cartoons. The prints are “The first in the East” “Poor Philotechnus” “Sworn to be worth 50 Dollars” “My dad you’d know so took below-“ “Infuriated Despondency!” “My son you are no longer admitted in St. Peter’s Door” and “Squire P_cock”. Print is inscribed in the upper right “25 Cents”.

 

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Folder 10
Sailors Glee.
[1805]; Akin, James (ca. 1773-1846). (20 x 14.5 cm). Link to CAEP record.

Etching and engraving featuring an interior scene with numerous men and women dancing and drinking in a tavern. In the foreground is a couple dancing and gazing into each other eyes. The man has his arm around the woman’s waist. To the left is a seated man playing a fiddle; beside him is a man drinking from a mug and an additional mug on a table. Two other figures, a man and a woman, are seated to the right and drinking. Mounted on the wall are three marine scenes and a clock with Roman Numerals reading “9:05”. Parenthetical text beneath reads “Singing Laughing, Dancing Quaffing, Both Cheerily, and Merrily And all for the Sake of his Girl on Shore-” and “Entered According to Law June 1 1805 & Published by James Akin, Engraver, Newburyport.”

 

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Folder 11
Mr and Mrs Bull reflecting on the Taxes.
[n.d.]; “Pub by Roberts Middle row Holborn”. [No BM Number] (27 x 43 cm).

Hand-colored line engraving featuring an interior, domestic scene with two people seated at a table with a white cloth. To the left is a woman in a pink dress with a white apron, a kerchief on her head and hands folded in her lap. She is saying “Mr. Bull you are always thinking of guzzling for my part I think of nothing but the loss of my cup of tea”; before her is a tea kettle, a cup and saucer, a goblet and a pitcher of ale. Seated to the right is a stout man with white hair wearing mustard-colored breeches, a blue coat and a red polka-dot vest in a striped chair. He is saying, “Ah you smiling rogues many a time have I got drunk with you but I am afraid we must part you get too strong for my pockets – sharp work to be sure _ laid on pretty Tightish _ but if I can’t beat Bonny without it _ why I must do as well as I can that’s all.” He has his hands in his pockets. In front of him on the table is a steaming mug, a bottle of port and a small glass.

 

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Folder 12
The New Minister or-As it should be.
[1806]; Pubd Feby 1806 by Walker No 7 Cornhill; Argus delt [Williams]. [BM 10528] (45 x 30 cm).

Hand-colored engraving bordered in gold which features four men in an interior scene on a decorated carpet. To the left is King George III stepping down from his throne, to his left is an additional man in hat. He is looking through a spy-glass at a short, stout Lord Fox with his hat and beard-growth. Between them is a man with a sword who states “The hon ‘ble Charles James Fox your M_ a man whose abilities the World have long admired, and whose Loyalty_ Integrity & Honor_I will answer for”. Fox states “The confidence which your M_ is pleased to repose in me makes me truly happy, I beg leave to assure your M_ that the honor of your M_ crown & the Glory of my Country is nearest my heart and while I am your M_ servant no Foreign Power shall dare insult the one, or diminish the other.” The king is states “What_what_what_Fox_Fox_Fox_ Very glad to see him_very glad to see him Honest man_Honest Man_great Abilities heard stories about him and Boney-don’t believe it-don’t believe it-be my secretary-be my Secretary of State!!”

 

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Folder 13
Boney & The Great State Secretary.
[1806]; Publish’d Feby 1806 by Walker No7 Cornhill; Argus delt [Williams]. [BM 10535] (45 x 29.5 cm).

Colored engraving bordered in gold which features two men, Napoleon and Lord Fox, talking. To the right is Fox with a large hat tucked under his arm clenching his fist; he is much taller and stouter than Napoleon. He says “Why you little Corsican reptile-how dare you come so near the person of the Right Honble [sic] C-J-F-one of his M- principal Secretaries of State. Member of the P-C_ &c &c &c &c &c &c &c &c go to see You!!-Arrogant little Man. Mr Boney-if you do not instantly Vanish from my sight I’le break every bone in your body-learn to behave yourself in a peaceable manner nor dar [sic] to set your foot on this happy land without my leave-.” Napoleon with large hat and feathers outstretches both arms stating “How do you do Master Charley why you are so fine I scarcely knew ye- don’t’ you remember me-why I am little Boney the Corsican-him that you came to see at Paris & very civil I was to you I’m sure If you come my way I shall be glad to see you-so will my Wife & Family they are a little changed in their dress as well as you-We shall be very happy to take a little Peace-soup with you when ever you are inclined Master Charley.” 

 

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Folder 14
The Effct [sic] of Whitebreads Entire or Wha Want a Guinea.
[1805]; Pubd by C Knight Lambeth and Sold at No 7 Cornhill; Argus Invet [Williams f]. [BM 10400] (29 x 45.5 cm).

Colored engraving featuring an exterior scene with Whitebread coming through the doorway of a tavern holding up foaming mug labeled “Whit” and gesturing towards four men. Overturned on the ground is an empty mug labeled “Whitebread”; one of the men, Melville, is in Tartan dress and is vomiting up coins into a bag labeled “Pro Bono Publico”; assisting him is a stout Lord Fox. To the left leaning up against the tavern is a thin and ill-looking Pitt. Kneeling on the ground is Sheridan with coins and bills coming out of his pocket. In the distance is a crowd with the Speaker on top of a barrel being carried by several men; he is holding a full mug. The crowd says “Huzza the Abbot of St. Stevens for Ever.” Four conversation bubbles appear at the top of the piece from Whitebread, Pitt, Fox and a member of the crowd.

 

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Folder 15
Rules for a Warm Weather Ball, or Salutary Conduct for Corpulent Dancers.
[n.d.]; Pubd by C Knight Lambeth and Sold at No 7 Cornhill; Argus del [Williams]. [BM 10664] (28 x 41.5 cm).

Colored engraving of an interior scene. In the foreground are two men speaking with a very large woman. To the left and right are two additional scenes. One of the men says to the woman “Dance first! Madam, and take the Rubber afterwards.” The woman is very well-dressed and fans her face with an elaborate fan; she also wears a large feathered headpiece; the woman says “Dear me it is perdigus [sic] Hot! Which would you advice me to do take a Rubber or Dance”. A second man with his hat tucked under his arm looks at the large woman. To the left is a musician stand with people dancing beneath. To the right is an archway leading to a room with several people sitting around a table playing cards.

 


This site last updated: December 2009

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