Box 3 Folder 1

BM 5827-6077a; 1781-82

 

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BM 5827 copy 1
The Balance of Power.
[1781]; R.S.; London, Published as ye Act directs, Jany 17 1781 by R. Wilkinson, at No. 58 in Cornhill, (25 x 35 cm)

Engraving with a poem beneath featuring a pair of scales with central beams labeled, “Balance of Power”; to the right the scale is resting on the ground with Britannia holding her shield and sword and saying “No one injures me with impunity”; her sword is labeled “The Sword of Justice”. To the right and dangling in the air on a scale is a Frenchman, a Spaniard, a sleeping America with a  headdress of feathers and breast exposed, and a Dutchman smoking a pipe attempting to pull down the scale with coins pouring out of his pocket as well as several documents.

 

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BM 5827 copy 2
The Balance of Power.
[1781]; R.S.; London, Published as ye Act directs, Jany 17 1781 by R. Wilkinson, at No. 58 in Cornhill, (29.5 x 39 cm)

Second copy of engraving described above.

 

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BM 5827 copy 3
The Balance of Power.
[1781]; R.S.; London, Published as ye Act directs, Jany 17 1781 by R. Wilkinson, at No. 58 in Cornhill, (29 x 46 cm)

Third copy of engraving described above.

 

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BM 5839
English Printet [English Print].
[1781]; s.n., (23.5 x 32 cm)

Engraving with letterpress type describing, in Dutch, the enumerated figures labeled inside the image 1-7. The image features a table with a procession of both men and animals walking in front of it. At the front of the procession is a stout man being bucked by a donkey; following is a unicorn with a cock on its back; behind him is a rear-facing man on a goat; behind him is a man sitting in a cart being driven by a small lion. At the table are eight men seated conversing in pairs, some wearing clerical or legal bands. To the right is a circle of four sailors dancing and one playing the fiddle.

 

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BM 5856
The State Watchmen Discover’d by the Genius of Britain, Studying plans for the Reduction of America.
[1781]; Rowlandson, Pubd by I. Jones, 10 Dec. 1781, (17.5 x 16.5 cm)

Colored engraving in a circle beneath which is the title. King George III is asleep on a sofa with his head down. Britannia is behind to the left holding with one hand liberty cap on a staff and the other hand is resting on the sofa. She is asking “Am I thus Protected?” behind the couch and looking on is a man asking “Hello Neighbour! What are you asleep?”. CPDBM indicates the engraving was created shortly after the surrender at Yorktown.

 

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BM 5859
[York Town].
[1781]; s.n.; No.2, (25.5 x 36.5 cm)

Engraving featuring the surrender of General Cornwallis at Yorktown. In the foreground is an image of a thin cow eating from dried-up grass. To the left are the figures of Spain, France and Holland leaning against a column labeled Mexico, Peru and Chile. In the distance is a cliff and several boats in a harbor as well as a sinking ship labeled “Eagle”; a tower in the distance is labeled “York Town” and before it alongside buildings are Native Americans under a tent, a blindfolded justice, several barrels and four men identified by their clothing as three Englishmen and a Scotsman in front of them. In the foreground is an Englishman kneeling on one knee and hands clasped looking upwards. Next to him sits a lion holding up his paw after stepping on a broken teapot. To the left are rats pulling apart a box and ripping up bank notes.

 

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BM 5957a
[Les Anglois Molestes Et Chatiees].
[1781]; s.n., (26.5 x 33 cm)

Colored engraving with French text beneath. To the left are three figures, two men and a woman being led away in chains; they are Ireland, England and Scotland. Holding onto the chains is George Washington with a whip in his hand and hat which looks like a mitre labeled “Congress Washington”. To the left are two ships on rough seas. In the sky is a sun painted blue with French crosses and numerous rays extending from its center.

 

BM 5960 [see Folio]

 

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BM 5961
The Royal Hunt, or a Prospect of the Year 1782.
[1782]; Published according to Act of Paliament by R. Owen, in Fleet Street Feby 16th 1782; South Briton fecit North Briton Invt, (24.5 x 34.5 cm)

Engraving with a key beneath. In the foreground of the image is a group of people including the following figures: a women with her dress open and chest exposed holding up a goblet, Pitt, Fox, Burke, the Duke of Richmond, Lord North, Rigby, Amherst and Lord Germain. Behind them are men galloping on a hunt after a stag; most prominent is King George. To the right is Britannia weeping upon her shield next to several dismantled columns; behind is a structure with a dome being pulled down by figures identifiable as the Netherlands, France, America and Spain. In the distance on the water are several ships, some with sails and some without.

 

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BM 5964
Changing Places;-Alias; Fox Stinking the Badger out of his Next.
[1782]; CPDBM identifies as by Gillray; Pubd March 22, 1782 by W. Humphrey No. 227 Strand, (28.5 x 39.5 cm)

Engraving set in a wooded landscape which illustrates Lord North as a badger running away wearing his sash with his tail between his legs; he has a compass drawn out on his face. To the right of him is Charles Fox as a fox defecating; the excreted waste is labeled “Eloquence”; he is standing over a bag of open coins and playing cards. To the right and behind the two animals is a statue labeled “Janus” as well as a signpost labeled “To Tower-Hill” and “To the Treasury” pointing in opposite directions; in the foreground is a bundle labeled “Budget” with bars inscribed “Soap”. To the left in the distance is a hunt with a stag in the lead followed closely by King George.

 

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BM 5982
The Political Mirror or an Exhibition of Ministers for April 1782.
[1782]; Razo Rezio inv Crunk Fogo sculp, (22.5 x 28 cm)

Engraving which features a procession of sixteen men; to the right is a pit where several of the men are falling in; inside the hole is a devil and a demon pulling the men down. To the left seated with sword and shield is Britannia. In the air is Bute on the back of a witch riding a broom and falling forward. An angel in the cloud to the left deflects light from a looking-glass labeled “The Mirror of Truth”; CPDBM identifies the men as members of old Ministry falling in the pit while members of the new Ministry to the right look on. Speech bubbles with text protrude from all of the Minister’s mouths.

 

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BM 5987
Britannia’s Assassination. Or – the Republicans Amusement.
[1782]; CPDBM identifies the artist as Gillray; Pubd May 10 1782 by E. D’Archery St. James Street, (29 x 48.5 cm)

Engraving with the new members of the Ministry pulling apart a statue of Britannia; the head of the statue is missing as is the shield which has been carried away by the figure of a Dutchman. To the left is America carrying away the head and a Frenchman stating “You dam Dog, you run way with all de Branche”. Represented members of ministry are Charles Fox, as a fox, Burke with the “Reformation Bill” Dunning with “Sydney on Government” and Wilkes with a rolled document labeled “Libel”. One member also holds up the butt end of a rifle and another displays a flagstaff.

 

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BM 5988
Anticipation, or, the Contrast to the Royal Hunt.
[1782]; Publishd May. 16th 1782. by Wm Wells No. 132 (opposite Salisbury Court) Fleet Street. London. Britons fact, (29 x 40.5 cm)

Colored engraving with some figures identified by a key along the bottom. The image features a seated Britannia to the right extending an olive branch towards the left. Behind her are members of the new Ministry restoring a broken domed structure. France and America stand with olive branches while Holland kneels before them to the left. In the distance a battle rages between ships. Represented are the figures of Fox, Camden, Sandwich and Lord North in the guise of a washerwoman. Behind North is King George in a chair while an oculist applies something to his eye. There are several bundles and packages on the floor which are labeled “Untaxed Soap” “For Sr J Delaval” “M-nd-n’s foul linen” and “119th”. In the distance is a stable labeled “Tatershalls” with several figures and horses inside, likely before a hunt.

 

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BM 5992
Rodney Triumphant – or Admiral Lee Shore in the Dumps.
[1782]; Political Characters & Caracatures [sic] of 1782. No 3 [Gillray] Pubd. May 31st 1782 by E’D’Achery St. James Street London, (25 x 34.5 cm)

Engraving which features Rodney’s victory and the effect this had on the new Ministry. The scene is an exterior view with crowd gathered to the right and several stoic figures standing to the left in front of a building labeled with a sign “Rusty” and “27 July Gloria”. De Grasse is bowing to Rodney who is standing on the French flag; frogs jump out of De Grasse’s pocket. The crowd is mostly made up of cheering soldiers who carry boxes labeled “Do No 26” and “Lewis d’or’s”; in the air is a crown labeled “from Jove”; in the distance are numerous ships with British flags. To the left are the politicians such as Fox, Keppel and the Duke of Richmond; behind are North and Sandwich.

 

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BM 5996
Rodney Invested – or – Admiral Pig on a Cruize [sic].
[1782]; CPDBM identifies artist as Gillray; Political Characters & Caricatures of 1782, No. IV. Pubd June 4th 1782 by E. D’Achery St. James’s Street London, (24.5 x 34.5 cm)

Engraving which features a seated Britannia to the right with olive branch extending a spear towards Rodney who is also holding a trident. The trident is being handed to him by Neptune rising from the sea stating “Accept my Son the Empire of the Main”. Behind them is a seated lion clawing at a French flag which is beneath the three figures. To the right is a body of water with a small boat made of playing cards with a pig looking through a spy glass. In the far distance is Fox on a small island with a paper inscribed “I.O.U. 17000”.

 

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BM 6008
Rodney’s New Invented Turn About.
[1782]; Pub by T. Colley July 1 1782. Rolls building London, (14 x 19.5 cm)

Engraving featuring four bare-chested men rotating a turn about while two additional men to the left whip them. The four men in the turnstile are France, America, Spain and Dutch [Holland]. The image is annotated beneath “The Little Admiral giving the Enemy’s of Great Britain a Flagellation”. To the left Rodney holds up the whip and is stating “Peace you Combin’d fools, I’ll give it you Monsieur for your Presumption”; a second man looks on holding a club saying “Da-n the Frog give him another dozen”.

 

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BM 6022
“Guy-vaux & Judas-Iscariot”.
[1782]; CPDBM identifies artist as Gillray; AAS copy trimmed. Dialogues of the Dead: page 1782; Pubd Augt 14th 1782 by E.D’Achery St. James’s Street, (24 x 33.5 cm)

Colored engraving which features two figures standing against a dark background. The left figure is a Fox, a representation of Charles Fox, holding onto a lantern saying “Ah! What I’ve found you out, have I? Who arm’d the high Priests & the People? Who betray’d his Mas-”; the rays of the lantern light up the face of Shelburne who is wrapped up in a blue cloak. Shelburne is stating “Ha Ha! Poor Gunpowder’s vexed! – He, he, he! Shan’t have the Bag I tell you, Old Goosetooth!”.

 

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BM 6029
The Habeas Corpus, or the Wild Geese Flying Away with Fox to America.
[1782]; Pubd by J. Barrow August. 27. 1782. No 9., (26 x 38.5 cm)

Engraving which shows seven geese flying to the left with conversation bubbles protruding from their mouths; the four geese are interlaced with a ribbon which is pulling a fox who states, “I hope they will bear me safe to the dear independent Congress.” In a tree to the right is a bird saying “Farewell Brother Chatter”; in the distance are three ships on the water, one firing guns. 

 

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BM 6031
Scene Le Vrog House.
[1782]; CPDBM identifies artist as Gillray; Pubd Sepr 3d 1782 by E.D’Achery St. James’s Street, (27 x 35 cm)

Engraving featuring four figures standing on a French flag and holding an ensign flag. The four men are identified by numbers in a key in the lower left. They are Admiral Rodney taking a pinch of snuff and looking left, to the left of him is De Grasse crouching and defecating into a chamber pot which is being held by Vaudreuil. To the far left is Bougainville running off, holding snuff to his nose.

 

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BM 6043
Taleo, or the Royal Sportsman, Running Down the Enemies of Great Britain.
[1782]; Pub. By T: Colley Decr 9. 1782 London, (26.5 x 40 cm)

Engraving which features a hunt. To the left is King George on horseback stating “Taleo. Taleo. Taleo-o-o-o” and holding out a whip; beneath him is a stout Dutchman who has fallen onto his back; there are four dogs which run alongside the horse labeled on their collars as Rodney, Howe, Pigot, Elliott, and Parker. They are chasing a representation of France over a fence, which looks like a jester. To the far right is Spain wearing a cape and crown. The top is engraved with the text “Lewis Baboon, taking a flying leap.”

 

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BM 6077a
William Pitt Il Faut Declarer La Guerre a la France.
[1782]; s.n., (19 x 12 cm)

Engraving taken from the text Essais historiques et politiques sur les Anglo-Américains by Michel-Rene Hilliard d’Auberteuil. Image features a portrait of William Pitt facing the viewer with two crutches and his right arm extended; before him is a balcony with columned pillars and to his left and right are two men looking upwards.

 


This site last updated: November 2009

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